colchrishadfield:

Artwork by Cindy Bolivar (I believe), whom I’ve never met. Cool!

koreanmodel:

Jung Ho Yeon by Hyea W. Kang for Vogue Korea September 2014

thinksquad:

The West has been suffering from a severe drought since 2013 and, in some cases, much longer than that. Conditions are particularly acute in California, where close to 60% of the state is experiencing “exceptional” drought after three years of below average rainfall. This is the worst category according to the U.S. Drought Monitor.

According to a new study published in the journal Science, the regional drought has cost the West about 240 gigatons of surface to near-surface water, or about 63 trillion gallons of water. This is equivalent to covering the entire western U.S. with a four-inch layer of water, the study found.

http://mashable.com/2014/08/27/in-pictures-the-west-has-lost-63-trillion-gallons-of-water-during-drought/?utm_cid=mash-com-fb-main-link

heyfunniest:

Someone took a candid photo of a fight in Ukranian Parliament that is as well-composed as the best renaissance art.

A HANDFUL OF DUST - JG Ballard

highrise-movie:

In this 2006 article for The Guardian, Ballard says that the modernists wanted to strip the world of mystery and emotion. No wonder they excelled at the architecture of death.
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Few people today visit Utah beach. The sand seems colder and flatter than anywhere else along the Normandy coast where the Allies landed on D-day. The town of Arromanches - a few miles to the east and closer to Omaha, Gold and Sword beaches - is a crowded theme park of war museums, cemeteries and souvenir shops, bunkers and bunting. Guidebooks in hand, tourists edge gingerly around the German gun emplacements and try to imagine what it was like to stare down the gun sights at the vast armada approaching the shore.

But Utah beach, on the western edge of the landing grounds, is silent. A few waves swill over the sand as if too bored to think of anything else. The coastal land seems lower than the sea, and fails to echo the sounds of war inside one’s head.

Walking along the beach some years ago, I noticed a dark structure emerging from the mist ahead of me. Three storeys high, and larger than a parish church, it was one of the huge blockhouses that formed Hitler’s Atlantic wall, the chain of fortifications that ran from the French coast all the way to Denmark and Norway. This blockhouse, as indifferent to time as the pyramids, was a mass of black concrete once poured by the slave labourers of the Todt Organisation, pockmarked by the shellfire of the attacking allied warships.

A flight of steps at its rear led me into the dank interior with its gun platforms and sinister letter box view of the sea. Generations of tramps had dossed here, and in the stairwells were the remains of small fires, piles of ancient excrement and a vague stench of urine.

At first sight, the blockhouse reminded me of the German forts at Tsingtao, the beach resort in north China that my family visited in the 1930s. Tsingtao had been a German naval base during the first world war, and I was taken on a tourist trip to the forts, a vast complex of tunnels and gun emplacements built into the cliffs. The cathedral-like vaults with their hydraulic platforms resembled Piranesi’s prisons, endless concrete galleries leading to vertical shafts and even further galleries. The Chinese guides took special pleasure in pointing out the bloody handprints of the German gunners driven mad by the British naval bombardment.

Years later, in that Utah beach blockhouse, I was looking at similar stains on the concrete walls, but the scattered rubbish and tang of urine made me think of structures closer to home in England - run-down tower blocks and motorway exit ramps, pedestrian underpasses sprung from the drawing boards of enlightened planners who would never have to live in or near them, and who were careful never to stray too far from their Georgian squares in the heart of heritage London.

[You can read the rest of Ballard’s essay at The Guardian website]

Re-blog if you’re accepting anonymous asks from anyone about anything

(Source: hunterraiehorror)

cminorsounds:

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Violence continues to erupt in Ferguson, Mo., more than a week after the fatal shooting of unarmed teen Michael Brown by policeman Darren Wilson. The 18-year-old’s family demands justice be brought to their son with the arrest of the six-year…

Just in case you don’t know about whats going on in Ferguson MO. This is a whole timeline from start to finish.

4,320 meters above sea level in the mountains of Chile, the El Tatio geyser has been spewing scalding hot steam for thousands of years. 

Photographer Owen Perry traveled to the remote region and captured some incredible photos of the geyser right before sunrise.

(Source: photojojo)

A volte qualche passo avanti lo si fa.

objectoccult:

Before the availability of the tape recorder and during the 1950s, when vinyl was scarce, people in the Soviet Union began making records of banned Western music on discarded x-rays. With the help of a special device, banned bootlegged jazz and rock ‘n’ roll records were “pressed” on thick radiographs salvaged from hospital waste bins and then cut into discs of 23-25 centimeters in diameter. “They would cut the X-ray into a crude circle with manicure scissors and use a cigarette to burn a hole,” says author Anya von Bremzen. “You’d have Elvis on the lungs, Duke Ellington on Aunt Masha’s brain scan — forbidden Western music captured on the interiors of Soviet citizens.”

(Source: altug)

postgraduatepunk:

Viktor Vasnetsov, Gamaun, the Prophetic Bird, 1897.